Our Coffee

Here at The Coffee Barn we are very proud of our coffee. We spent a considerable amount of time and effort (not entirely unenjoyable) in selecting and refining our blend of high quality Brazilian, Indian and Central American beans (90% Arabica and 10% Robusta), which produces a sweet and velvety smooth medium strength coffee.

Indian Monsoon Malabar Story

The color, shape, and size of these beans from India, as well as their aroma and taste, are the result of special post-harvest processing. Historically, coffee was shipped to Europe in wooden sailing vessels that took four to six months to sail around the Cape of Good Hope and up to their destinations. Stored below the water line and kept in an atmosphere made humid by seawater seeping through the wood, the beans underwent a transformation on their long journey to market. The bright-green beans would arrive pale gold, doubled in size and with an entirely new cup profile.

This “monsooning” process was later systematically replicated in India, with the goal of providing European customers with the cup profile they’d first become accustomed to from India and continued to demand.
The monsooning process consists of exposing natural coffee beans, in 4- to 6-inch-thick piles, to moisture-laden monsoon winds in a well-ventilated brick or concrete-floored warehouse. This process is carried out on the West Coast of India, making use of the winds from the Arabian Sea during the southwest Monsoon months of June through September.
The processing begins with top-grade beans, Arabica cherry AB, that has already been processed by the dry method. To equalize moisture absorption, the beans are raked frequently, followed by bulking and re-bagging at regular intervals. During this 12- to 16-week process, the beans absorb moisture in stages, swelling to nearly twice their original size and developing colors ranging from pale gold to light brown. After several weeks, the coffee is re-bulked, graded again, bagged and moved to a drier region for longer-term storage.

Brazilian Santos Story

Brazil is a well-known coffee producing giant. They source around one-third of the world’s coffee, making them the largest coffee producer in the globe! Of course, most of this is lower grade Arabica. However, this country is capable of producing specialty coffees.

This particular type is a standard specialty quality coffee. It is dry-processed, meaning the beans are patio-dried while they are still in the cherry. Since the coffees are dried in contact with the sweet mucilage, the coffee’s cup profile will be heavy in body, sweet, smooth, and complex. The 17/18 screen size has a more consistent flavor without the pungent fruit notes that can turn up in smaller screen sized beans, which is an indication of varying bean maturity.

Colombian Excelso Story

Colombia is the second largest producer of coffee in the world and the largest producer of washed and Arabica coffee. They are well known for their high quality coffee and exports approximately 12.5 million bags and internal consumption is about 2 million bags annually.

Colombia only produces washed Arabica coffee. There are three primary varieties grown in Colombia and the coffee is referred to by the region in which it is grown. There are many coffee producing regions in the country. Colombia is proficient in producing an abundance of truly delicious and sought after coffee.

“Excelso” is a grading term for exportable coffee from Colombia, not related to variety or cupping profile. EP (European Preparation) specifies that the raw beans are all hand sorted to remove any defective beans and foreign material. Excelso coffee beans are large, but slightly smaller than Supremo coffee beans. Excelso coffee beans are a screen size of 15-16, versus Supremo beans which are sized on screen 17. Colombian coffee is graded before shipment according to bean size. It is possible that Supremo and Excelso coffee beans are harvested from the same tree, but they are sorted by its size. The greatest volume of exported coffee is Excelso. These beans include good-to-large flat beans and some pea berries.

Indian Cherry Robusta AA Story

Robusta coffee from India is notable for several reasons. The production of Robusta in India is almost double that of Arabica, and while Robusta is generally considered the poor relation of the former, in India the same care applied to the cultivation, harvest and processing of Arabica coffee is applied to Robusta. Both natural/dry-processed Robusta and Arabica coffees in India are known as Cherry (not to be confused with the cherry fruit on the coffee tree!). Cherry AA indicates the highest grade of these particular beans.